The Precedent
The Precedent

The braggadocio thumb in the armpit, the pointed elbow to keep competition at bay and the dollar bill worn on the shoulder, are all indications of a narcissist. 

    His view of women is that they are bodies with no minds of their own. Their lower bodies are up for grabs. His lips reaches everywhere to kiss them – whenever and wherever he wants.

    While eyeing his own sexual fulfillment, his head is filled with breasts with aroused nipples. That he depends heavily on his macho exposure to support his ideas is beyond doubt.

    The words voiced by his tongue have a large hole in the logic. His thoughts are as twisted and unrealistic as his limbs, which keep manipulating the reality surrounding him to impose his own views.

    He sips the truth he wants to digest from one source only – a bottled version of his own brand of green.

    The cigarette is full of burning criticism for his persona, a poison he filters through the holder. 

    His whole being has taken on the color of the greenback dollar, but he’s not large enough to fit the pants he has proposed to fill. Yet he still has the aspiration to ride into the sunset with the approval he vainly seeks – that is, the approval of everybody.

 

The Colorful Side of Susana
The Colorful Side of Susana

The colors represent the personality and the many moods of this truly exceptional person.

Three Spanish Figures United in the Ancient Greek Concept of Beauty
Three Spanish Figures United in the Ancient Greek Concept of Beauty

The philosophers in ancient Greece considered the spiral the form that best illustrated perfect harmony. Mathematically this was proved by Archimedes in the third century BC in one of the many forms the spiral can be executed: the arithmetic spiral. However, in nature many other kinds of spirals can be found.

    Within the spiral in the painting, there are three figures, representing three great Spanish painters who lived and worked in the twentieth century using other mathematical forms in their works. Here the spiral is formed by a cube, a circle and a rhinoceros horn, which were used by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Salvador Dalí, respectively, to express their particular view of beauty and perfect harmony.

War from a Critical Point of View
War from a Critical Point of View

GENERAL INFORMATION

Oil on canvas. Painted September 1998 through February 2000. Signed on the sarcophagus in the centre.

THE EYE

The painting measures 510 x 170 cm. The light in the pupil is located in the exact centre of the painting.

COMPOSITION

Two crosses make up the basic composition. 

The first one is made up of two diagonal lines from corner to corner. 

The second one is three-dimensional and made up by the two bullets. One bullet has been fired in the axis towards the spectator and is located where the two diagonal lines meet (the centre of the painting). The second bullet has been fired on the horizontal axis that is the golden cut of the painting. The golden cut is the section where the smaller part has the same proportion in distance to the bigger part, as the bigger part to their combined distance.

HISTORICAL PERSONS

The adult Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler as a child

Slobodan Milosevic

Napoleon Bonaparte

Genghis Khan

Saddam Hussein

THE SCENES DEPICTING REASONS FOR WAR

Adolf Hitler, who wanted to conquer the world by initiating the 2nd World War in 1939. 100 million people died.

Adolf Hitler as a child in 1890. Is a person born evil or is he made evil by society and circumstances?

L’Arc de Triomphe, Place d’Étoile, Paris. A monument made for glorify the conquest of other peoples. 

Poster of Milosevic, the butcher from Serbia guilty of genocide for.

Medals for valiant fighting for victory.

Map over unknown territories ripe for conquest (Mexico and the Caribbean in the XVI century).

Crusaders who in the name of religion set out on crusades to vanquish the ‘infidels’.

Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) who for glory and power conquered and crowned himself emperor of all Europe.

Leaves of laurel; since the times of the Roman emperors the symbol of the victor.

Genghis Khan from Mongolia who during the Middle Ages conquered more territory than anyone in history.

Saddam Hussein of Iraq, guilty of genocide. When his army was forced to leave Kuwait after his attempt to conquer the country, he ordered all oil wells to be set on fire. Kuwait was inundated with oil. It took eight months to put out the fire.

THE SCENES DEPICTING MEANS TO MAKE WAR

Cannon from XVII century. The technology to forge iron into mortal weapons gave the Europeans the advantage they needed to conquer and dominate most of the world from the XIV through the XIX century.

Barbed wire used in forced labour and concentration camps.

Medieval sword. The taller Europeans could use longer swords that gave them an advantage in battles against the peoples they wanted to subjugate.

A rifle bullet. The firearms developed in Europe gave the conquerors of the Americas enormous advantages.

Fire. The simplest, quickest and least costly way to victory. It has been used to burn forts and villages, smoke out forest hideouts and to teach the obstinate a lesson. The Russians have on various occasions used fire for their burnt-soil strategy leaving nothing behind to eat for the arriving armies. 

Atomic bomb explosion as an exclamation mark where the painting ends. The most lethal weapon made by humans in existence. The first two were used by USA against Japan and ended the 2nd World War in August 1945.

The US Revolver Colt Peacemaker from 1830. With arms like this emigrants from Europe conquered the Wild West and sent the surviving Indians to reservations.

THE SCENES DEPICTING EFFECTS OF WAR

Pile of human skulls from the Killing Fields. During the tyranny rule of Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouges in the 1970’s over a million men, women and children were slaughtered.

Detail from the giant work ‘Guernica’ painted Pablo Picasso after he was informed that Francisco Franco had bombed the homonymous village in 1936 during the Spanish Civil War.

A bridge – symbol for human relations, dialogue, communication and trade – that is being blown up.

A hand that is tearing down the propaganda for a warmonger with promises of greatness through military conquest. The poster has been pasted on a brick wall, symbol for inaccessibility.

African boy, a victim of endless local wars, who is being taught how to use a firearm to kill instead of being educated.

A starving child.

A burning village.

A raped woman.

Death. During 1999 there were 24 million people killed or mutilated in acts of war.

A sarcophagus. In many countries there monuments over a symbolic tomb for a fallen unknown soldier.

A cross made in blood marking the premeditated decision to conquer a people by military force in the knowledge that the cost is human lives.

Execution by a shot in the neck in front of a mass grave.

A scene by Francisco Goya from his drawings of ‘The Disasters of War’. These were done from what he actually saw during the invasion of Spain by Napoleon’s troops circa 1800.

An invalid with one leg taken off by a landmine. The landmine is one of the cheapest weapons that can be built. The average cost in 1999 was 15 US dollars. It is still considered that there are millions of landmines left in countries that have suffered war on their territory during the XX century, which prevents the cultivation of land.

REFERENCES TO ART IN HISTORY & TECHNIQUES USED

Horse, detail from ‘Guernica’ by Pablo Picasso (cubism).

Monument, the triumphal arch on Place d’Étoile in Paris.

Medieval sword (futurism).

The background of the crusaders (impressionism)

‘Napoleon Bonaparte’ by David (romanticism).

From the series ‘The Disasters of War’ by Francisco Goya (realism).

The explosion of an atomic bomb (expressionism).

Revolver (photo-realism)

THE ANSWER

The answer to the question that the painting should provoke is a detail found in the photograph of Adolf Hitler as a child.

 

 

A Soft Existence in a Hard World
A Soft Existence in a Hard World

For many, the world is a hard place to live in, while a precious few have an easy time living inside a gilded cage. The world is a pocket watch where time is the only constant. The land masses are brick wall enclosures, and the amorphous, eye-less, golden figure is blind to all from inside his comfortable prison of ignorance.

Logic in Play
Logic in Play

“It is easier for a camel to come through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven.”

    The stage is a chessboard, a game that is won by logic. The caravan whip is wrapped around a needle made of gold. The camel stands clear in the needle’s eye. 

    The logic for the apparently impossible action of a camel passing through the eye of a needle, is the use of perspective. 

Lovers are Never in Lack of Kisses
Lovers are Never in Lack of Kisses
One With the Bull
One With the Bull

“You’re there, alone, with a fearsome half-a-ton beast who doesn’t have much hope living beyond another 20 minutes. There’s a ring in the ears from the audience cheers – but it soon fades. You’re one with the bull. You have to make your performance and you have to kill it – or it will kill you.”

    Excerpt from A toreador’s memoirs by Miguel “ El Sevillano” Hernández.

Fruitful Cooperation
Fruitful Cooperation
From Tabula Rasa to Universal Knowledge
From Tabula Rasa to Universal Knowledge

The journey of life: We are born with a clean slate – completely innocent and with no prejudice or information whatsoever – like a paper with no impression on it. The world is black and white, there are no shades of gray. Through the eye, innocence is a dove perceiving life as a journey that it is about to initiate.

    In the second phase, by their nature, the two birds of prey – representing Genetic Heritage and Experience – devour innocence. In exchange, they color the surrounding world with perspective and dynamics.

    The final part of the metamorphosis converts the virgin paper (i. e. the “tabula rasa”) into unlimited space, where the apple of wisdom and the fountain of expression are encountered.

    As part of the transformation – the eye of innocence, the two birds of prey, and the apple with the pen – have the exact form although they are depicted in different colors and positions.

The Discovery that led to the Explosion of Species
The Discovery that led to the Explosion of Species

This painting consists of nine separate segments, all rhombs within an all-encompassing rhomb that suggests the female body.

    The top rhomb, with its bed of rose leaves, demonstrates the female expectancy confronted with procreation. The two flowers – similar, yet different – are one rose and one carnation. Not the same, but almost. Her neck is adorned with a shell necklace.

    The second and third rhomb, although very similar, once again demonstrate that the dissimilitude makes all the difference. Apparently two female breasts, they are eggs and sperms in contact. The left breast is reddish, the right breast is greenish. The way the sperm move is also different.

    The rhomb with the hand holding the fish is the provider of food. The rhomb with the hand holding a bird offers beauty, entertainment and adornment. In a protective stance, both hands appear from behind on each side of the female body. 

    In the middle, the tiger’s head symbolizes the survival of the species. The fly on its nose is the female’s navel. The tiger and the fly are two species resulting from the same evolution.

    Below are the thighs of the female; one depicting a serpent and the other a lizard. Both these animals are evolutions from the same ancestor, but the sexual revolution six hundred million years ago have made them distinctly different.

    At the bottom, between the female’s legs, is a dromedary resting on nine clouds. The dromedary is a symbol for the male libido.

THE ATLAS OF LUST
THE ATLAS OF LUST

There are beasts of lust, but, truly, they are mere beasts of burden. Atlas, who in Greek mythology was tricked into carrying the world on his shoulders, had a lesser-known brother by the same name. Across the deserts in longing hearts, he was condemned to the task of carrying man’s lust without rest as long as it exists.

The Enigma of the Father, the Son and the Ghoulish Host
The Enigma of the Father, the Son and the Ghoulish Host

The medieval night scene shows an older man holding up a five-candle candelabra to light a scene where a mysterious figure stands between him and a young boy. Behind the older man, the father, stands a light-clad woman who with intimate gestures offers him grapes while he is drinking wine from tin cup. 

    At the opposite end of the table, the son is holding a single candle while raising his hand in a gesture that can either be interpreted as swearing an oath, giving a promise or signaling a refusal. 

    Between them stands a faceless man who holds out a key to the father while he beckons to the son. The opening in his robe reveals a staircase. In his right hand is a key that he holds out to the father. The key fits into the keyhole of the oak chest next to the son.

     The tablecloth shows clear, biblical references of fish and bread loaves on one side, and teeth and eyes on the other. The father has a sumptuous plate of fruits in front of him, while the table in front of the boy is empty.

    In the background is a red drapery, drawn to show a window with stars beyond it, suggesting freedom. Behind the faceless figure are three torches. In the kitchen behind the boy are three copper vessels on the wall and three ceramic pots on the stove.

Self-portait by a Blind Man
Self-portait by a Blind Man

For a blind man to paint his self-portrait, the canvas must have a size that allows him to touch its surface guided by its edges, like a piano player knows his keyboard. Touching his face with one hand, he perceives no colors, only its texture. With the fingertips of his free hand, since he can’t use a brush with exactitude, he applies what he perceives with the other hand using white and black paints.

    Touch is the eyes of the blind.

A Holistic View of Susana
A Holistic View of Susana

When each separate painting is viewed, they result in four abstract works. When assembled, they show the face of Susana.

Columbus' Egg
Columbus' Egg

If you want to make an omelette you need to break some new ground. 

 

The Siren in the Woods
The Siren in the Woods

The dark and mysterious forests in the far north of Europe are inhabited by the dangerous siren of the woods. She is a beautiful woman who seductively beckons any man she encounters to follow her. As she lures them deeper into the forest, she never turns her back.

    Borne long ago by a tree, her back is rotted hollow by the ages. She doesn’t want her hollow back and hairy tail to give her away.

    No man beguiled by her charms ever finds his way out of the forest.

Night Descends on Mother Earth (Stain Glass version)
Night Descends on Mother Earth (Stain Glass version)

The brightest stars traces the shape of a man who is gently descending to embrace mother Earth who awaits her lover in the pale moonlight.

Night Descends on Mother Earth (Oil on Canvas)
Night Descends on Mother Earth (Oil on Canvas)

The brightest stars traces the shape of a man who is gently descending to embrace mother Earth who awaits her lover in the pale moonlight.

The Plant of Evil Revealed
The Plant of Evil Revealed

This is the second of three paintings, forming part of both a story sequel and a life-long experience. 

    The first painting , The Plant of Evil, was executed by the painter at the ageof seventeen. Sold, and then returned to the painter after thirty-three years, he painted this sequel based on the first painting of which he had no memories. The third painting will be done by him at the age of eighty-three, after another 33 years have lapsed. This third painting will be called The Plant of Evil: The Final Solution.

    The second version gives several, although incomplete, explanations to the painting executed thirty-three years previously.

    The smaller flower is now more threatening. Its tongue is wrapped around a victim whose arm is the only part visible. An identification number is tattooed on the arm.

    The larger flower is more developed than the one in the previous painting, and it sports a similar tongue. The flower has the face of Adolf Hitler. His teeth have turned into those of a predator’s. The paper with the star of David is glued to his forehead. His hair replicates Medusa’s, with its many crawling snakes. 

    The serpent, which in the past painting had begun as a sprout on the same branch as the monstrous head, has now grown though its mouth and out of one eye socket. It looks ahead towards the future.

    The sky has darkened with ominous clouds heralding the approaching storm. In the horizon the darkness of the former painting has now been replaced by the lights of weapons being fired against a background of lightnings. “Die Blitzkrieg” [Lightning War] has been introduced to human history. 

    On other parts of the plant, the syringe has now been emptied into the branch that supports it. The effect from the liquid, white and undisturbed, is an experiment with DNA genetics, suggesting those made by “The Angel of Death”, Josef Mengele.

    The wind sock has been replaced for one in red and white colors showing where the wind blows. The match has been transformed into an olympic torch. The leaves have turned into a stack of bills with the many zeros of hyperinflation.

    The axe stuck in the ground has the executor’s head located on the handle. In lieu of the simple tool depicted in the previous painting, the axe has transformed into nostalgia symbol from a pseudo-romantic past. The intense gaze in the eyes in the decapitated victim’s head continue to stare from the executioner’s hood and his Gestapo cap. The blood no longer flows; it now trickles slowly into the bottle which is less than half full. The rope, previously tied to the shaft of the ax, hangs from the tip of the smaller flower’s tongue. At the other end of the rope a cage with an apple is swinging, indicating that knowledge is being controlled.

    The poker is now exposed through a crack in the flower pot. Stuck on is another apple that is being roasted over a bonfire of books. The cigarette, put out and with lipstick smears, lies in its shadow. In the smoke from the bonfire, the drops of saliva from the monstrous head are dancing. On the right side the yellow object has swung a quarter of a turn and is revealed to be a pocket watch. On its face the most important years for the progress of nazism are shown.

    The spider has exchanged its simple web for one of steel that covers the opening of the flower pot. Cyanide gas is spreading through the grating.

    The cracks in the flower pot has grown into a swastika. The shards from these have fallen on the ground with the glassy side upwards, spelling the word “HEIL”, instead of “HELL” in the previous painting. The shards of glass are a reference to the “Kristallnacht” in November 1938. In the center of the swastika an arm holds a globe in a firm grip. 

    As in the previous painting, unchanged and remaining in the exact same position, a tiger tail dominates. Although all other elements in the composition have moved or changed, including the flower pot that now is located more to the right, the tiger tail is the only thing that is constant. It is the symbol for the evil in humans.

    In this, the second of three paintings, many clues have been given, but the most important ones are still missing. The final explanation will be shown in painting that will be executed in the year 2035.

 

The Precedent
The Colorful Side of Susana
Three Spanish Figures United in the Ancient Greek Concept of Beauty
War from a Critical Point of View
A Soft Existence in a Hard World
Logic in Play
Lovers are Never in Lack of Kisses
One With the Bull
Fruitful Cooperation
From Tabula Rasa to Universal Knowledge
The Discovery that led to the Explosion of Species
THE ATLAS OF LUST
The Enigma of the Father, the Son and the Ghoulish Host
Self-portait by a Blind Man
A Holistic View of Susana
Columbus' Egg
The Siren in the Woods
Night Descends on Mother Earth (Stain Glass version)
Night Descends on Mother Earth (Oil on Canvas)
The Plant of Evil Revealed
The Precedent

The braggadocio thumb in the armpit, the pointed elbow to keep competition at bay and the dollar bill worn on the shoulder, are all indications of a narcissist. 

    His view of women is that they are bodies with no minds of their own. Their lower bodies are up for grabs. His lips reaches everywhere to kiss them – whenever and wherever he wants.

    While eyeing his own sexual fulfillment, his head is filled with breasts with aroused nipples. That he depends heavily on his macho exposure to support his ideas is beyond doubt.

    The words voiced by his tongue have a large hole in the logic. His thoughts are as twisted and unrealistic as his limbs, which keep manipulating the reality surrounding him to impose his own views.

    He sips the truth he wants to digest from one source only – a bottled version of his own brand of green.

    The cigarette is full of burning criticism for his persona, a poison he filters through the holder. 

    His whole being has taken on the color of the greenback dollar, but he’s not large enough to fit the pants he has proposed to fill. Yet he still has the aspiration to ride into the sunset with the approval he vainly seeks – that is, the approval of everybody.

 

The Colorful Side of Susana

The colors represent the personality and the many moods of this truly exceptional person.

Three Spanish Figures United in the Ancient Greek Concept of Beauty

The philosophers in ancient Greece considered the spiral the form that best illustrated perfect harmony. Mathematically this was proved by Archimedes in the third century BC in one of the many forms the spiral can be executed: the arithmetic spiral. However, in nature many other kinds of spirals can be found.

    Within the spiral in the painting, there are three figures, representing three great Spanish painters who lived and worked in the twentieth century using other mathematical forms in their works. Here the spiral is formed by a cube, a circle and a rhinoceros horn, which were used by Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró and Salvador Dalí, respectively, to express their particular view of beauty and perfect harmony.

War from a Critical Point of View

GENERAL INFORMATION

Oil on canvas. Painted September 1998 through February 2000. Signed on the sarcophagus in the centre.

THE EYE

The painting measures 510 x 170 cm. The light in the pupil is located in the exact centre of the painting.

COMPOSITION

Two crosses make up the basic composition. 

The first one is made up of two diagonal lines from corner to corner. 

The second one is three-dimensional and made up by the two bullets. One bullet has been fired in the axis towards the spectator and is located where the two diagonal lines meet (the centre of the painting). The second bullet has been fired on the horizontal axis that is the golden cut of the painting. The golden cut is the section where the smaller part has the same proportion in distance to the bigger part, as the bigger part to their combined distance.

HISTORICAL PERSONS

The adult Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler as a child

Slobodan Milosevic

Napoleon Bonaparte

Genghis Khan

Saddam Hussein

THE SCENES DEPICTING REASONS FOR WAR

Adolf Hitler, who wanted to conquer the world by initiating the 2nd World War in 1939. 100 million people died.

Adolf Hitler as a child in 1890. Is a person born evil or is he made evil by society and circumstances?

L’Arc de Triomphe, Place d’Étoile, Paris. A monument made for glorify the conquest of other peoples. 

Poster of Milosevic, the butcher from Serbia guilty of genocide for.

Medals for valiant fighting for victory.

Map over unknown territories ripe for conquest (Mexico and the Caribbean in the XVI century).

Crusaders who in the name of religion set out on crusades to vanquish the ‘infidels’.

Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) who for glory and power conquered and crowned himself emperor of all Europe.

Leaves of laurel; since the times of the Roman emperors the symbol of the victor.

Genghis Khan from Mongolia who during the Middle Ages conquered more territory than anyone in history.

Saddam Hussein of Iraq, guilty of genocide. When his army was forced to leave Kuwait after his attempt to conquer the country, he ordered all oil wells to be set on fire. Kuwait was inundated with oil. It took eight months to put out the fire.

THE SCENES DEPICTING MEANS TO MAKE WAR

Cannon from XVII century. The technology to forge iron into mortal weapons gave the Europeans the advantage they needed to conquer and dominate most of the world from the XIV through the XIX century.

Barbed wire used in forced labour and concentration camps.

Medieval sword. The taller Europeans could use longer swords that gave them an advantage in battles against the peoples they wanted to subjugate.

A rifle bullet. The firearms developed in Europe gave the conquerors of the Americas enormous advantages.

Fire. The simplest, quickest and least costly way to victory. It has been used to burn forts and villages, smoke out forest hideouts and to teach the obstinate a lesson. The Russians have on various occasions used fire for their burnt-soil strategy leaving nothing behind to eat for the arriving armies. 

Atomic bomb explosion as an exclamation mark where the painting ends. The most lethal weapon made by humans in existence. The first two were used by USA against Japan and ended the 2nd World War in August 1945.

The US Revolver Colt Peacemaker from 1830. With arms like this emigrants from Europe conquered the Wild West and sent the surviving Indians to reservations.

THE SCENES DEPICTING EFFECTS OF WAR

Pile of human skulls from the Killing Fields. During the tyranny rule of Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouges in the 1970’s over a million men, women and children were slaughtered.

Detail from the giant work ‘Guernica’ painted Pablo Picasso after he was informed that Francisco Franco had bombed the homonymous village in 1936 during the Spanish Civil War.

A bridge – symbol for human relations, dialogue, communication and trade – that is being blown up.

A hand that is tearing down the propaganda for a warmonger with promises of greatness through military conquest. The poster has been pasted on a brick wall, symbol for inaccessibility.

African boy, a victim of endless local wars, who is being taught how to use a firearm to kill instead of being educated.

A starving child.

A burning village.

A raped woman.

Death. During 1999 there were 24 million people killed or mutilated in acts of war.

A sarcophagus. In many countries there monuments over a symbolic tomb for a fallen unknown soldier.

A cross made in blood marking the premeditated decision to conquer a people by military force in the knowledge that the cost is human lives.

Execution by a shot in the neck in front of a mass grave.

A scene by Francisco Goya from his drawings of ‘The Disasters of War’. These were done from what he actually saw during the invasion of Spain by Napoleon’s troops circa 1800.

An invalid with one leg taken off by a landmine. The landmine is one of the cheapest weapons that can be built. The average cost in 1999 was 15 US dollars. It is still considered that there are millions of landmines left in countries that have suffered war on their territory during the XX century, which prevents the cultivation of land.

REFERENCES TO ART IN HISTORY & TECHNIQUES USED

Horse, detail from ‘Guernica’ by Pablo Picasso (cubism).

Monument, the triumphal arch on Place d’Étoile in Paris.

Medieval sword (futurism).

The background of the crusaders (impressionism)

‘Napoleon Bonaparte’ by David (romanticism).

From the series ‘The Disasters of War’ by Francisco Goya (realism).

The explosion of an atomic bomb (expressionism).

Revolver (photo-realism)

THE ANSWER

The answer to the question that the painting should provoke is a detail found in the photograph of Adolf Hitler as a child.

 

 

A Soft Existence in a Hard World

For many, the world is a hard place to live in, while a precious few have an easy time living inside a gilded cage. The world is a pocket watch where time is the only constant. The land masses are brick wall enclosures, and the amorphous, eye-less, golden figure is blind to all from inside his comfortable prison of ignorance.

Logic in Play

“It is easier for a camel to come through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven.”

    The stage is a chessboard, a game that is won by logic. The caravan whip is wrapped around a needle made of gold. The camel stands clear in the needle’s eye. 

    The logic for the apparently impossible action of a camel passing through the eye of a needle, is the use of perspective. 

Lovers are Never in Lack of Kisses
One With the Bull

“You’re there, alone, with a fearsome half-a-ton beast who doesn’t have much hope living beyond another 20 minutes. There’s a ring in the ears from the audience cheers – but it soon fades. You’re one with the bull. You have to make your performance and you have to kill it – or it will kill you.”

    Excerpt from A toreador’s memoirs by Miguel “ El Sevillano” Hernández.

Fruitful Cooperation
From Tabula Rasa to Universal Knowledge

The journey of life: We are born with a clean slate – completely innocent and with no prejudice or information whatsoever – like a paper with no impression on it. The world is black and white, there are no shades of gray. Through the eye, innocence is a dove perceiving life as a journey that it is about to initiate.

    In the second phase, by their nature, the two birds of prey – representing Genetic Heritage and Experience – devour innocence. In exchange, they color the surrounding world with perspective and dynamics.

    The final part of the metamorphosis converts the virgin paper (i. e. the “tabula rasa”) into unlimited space, where the apple of wisdom and the fountain of expression are encountered.

    As part of the transformation – the eye of innocence, the two birds of prey, and the apple with the pen – have the exact form although they are depicted in different colors and positions.

The Discovery that led to the Explosion of Species

This painting consists of nine separate segments, all rhombs within an all-encompassing rhomb that suggests the female body.

    The top rhomb, with its bed of rose leaves, demonstrates the female expectancy confronted with procreation. The two flowers – similar, yet different – are one rose and one carnation. Not the same, but almost. Her neck is adorned with a shell necklace.

    The second and third rhomb, although very similar, once again demonstrate that the dissimilitude makes all the difference. Apparently two female breasts, they are eggs and sperms in contact. The left breast is reddish, the right breast is greenish. The way the sperm move is also different.

    The rhomb with the hand holding the fish is the provider of food. The rhomb with the hand holding a bird offers beauty, entertainment and adornment. In a protective stance, both hands appear from behind on each side of the female body. 

    In the middle, the tiger’s head symbolizes the survival of the species. The fly on its nose is the female’s navel. The tiger and the fly are two species resulting from the same evolution.

    Below are the thighs of the female; one depicting a serpent and the other a lizard. Both these animals are evolutions from the same ancestor, but the sexual revolution six hundred million years ago have made them distinctly different.

    At the bottom, between the female’s legs, is a dromedary resting on nine clouds. The dromedary is a symbol for the male libido.

THE ATLAS OF LUST

There are beasts of lust, but, truly, they are mere beasts of burden. Atlas, who in Greek mythology was tricked into carrying the world on his shoulders, had a lesser-known brother by the same name. Across the deserts in longing hearts, he was condemned to the task of carrying man’s lust without rest as long as it exists.

The Enigma of the Father, the Son and the Ghoulish Host

The medieval night scene shows an older man holding up a five-candle candelabra to light a scene where a mysterious figure stands between him and a young boy. Behind the older man, the father, stands a light-clad woman who with intimate gestures offers him grapes while he is drinking wine from tin cup. 

    At the opposite end of the table, the son is holding a single candle while raising his hand in a gesture that can either be interpreted as swearing an oath, giving a promise or signaling a refusal. 

    Between them stands a faceless man who holds out a key to the father while he beckons to the son. The opening in his robe reveals a staircase. In his right hand is a key that he holds out to the father. The key fits into the keyhole of the oak chest next to the son.

     The tablecloth shows clear, biblical references of fish and bread loaves on one side, and teeth and eyes on the other. The father has a sumptuous plate of fruits in front of him, while the table in front of the boy is empty.

    In the background is a red drapery, drawn to show a window with stars beyond it, suggesting freedom. Behind the faceless figure are three torches. In the kitchen behind the boy are three copper vessels on the wall and three ceramic pots on the stove.

Self-portait by a Blind Man

For a blind man to paint his self-portrait, the canvas must have a size that allows him to touch its surface guided by its edges, like a piano player knows his keyboard. Touching his face with one hand, he perceives no colors, only its texture. With the fingertips of his free hand, since he can’t use a brush with exactitude, he applies what he perceives with the other hand using white and black paints.

    Touch is the eyes of the blind.

A Holistic View of Susana

When each separate painting is viewed, they result in four abstract works. When assembled, they show the face of Susana.

Columbus' Egg

If you want to make an omelette you need to break some new ground. 

 

The Siren in the Woods

The dark and mysterious forests in the far north of Europe are inhabited by the dangerous siren of the woods. She is a beautiful woman who seductively beckons any man she encounters to follow her. As she lures them deeper into the forest, she never turns her back.

    Borne long ago by a tree, her back is rotted hollow by the ages. She doesn’t want her hollow back and hairy tail to give her away.

    No man beguiled by her charms ever finds his way out of the forest.

Night Descends on Mother Earth (Stain Glass version)

The brightest stars traces the shape of a man who is gently descending to embrace mother Earth who awaits her lover in the pale moonlight.

Night Descends on Mother Earth (Oil on Canvas)

The brightest stars traces the shape of a man who is gently descending to embrace mother Earth who awaits her lover in the pale moonlight.

The Plant of Evil Revealed

This is the second of three paintings, forming part of both a story sequel and a life-long experience. 

    The first painting , The Plant of Evil, was executed by the painter at the ageof seventeen. Sold, and then returned to the painter after thirty-three years, he painted this sequel based on the first painting of which he had no memories. The third painting will be done by him at the age of eighty-three, after another 33 years have lapsed. This third painting will be called The Plant of Evil: The Final Solution.

    The second version gives several, although incomplete, explanations to the painting executed thirty-three years previously.

    The smaller flower is now more threatening. Its tongue is wrapped around a victim whose arm is the only part visible. An identification number is tattooed on the arm.

    The larger flower is more developed than the one in the previous painting, and it sports a similar tongue. The flower has the face of Adolf Hitler. His teeth have turned into those of a predator’s. The paper with the star of David is glued to his forehead. His hair replicates Medusa’s, with its many crawling snakes. 

    The serpent, which in the past painting had begun as a sprout on the same branch as the monstrous head, has now grown though its mouth and out of one eye socket. It looks ahead towards the future.

    The sky has darkened with ominous clouds heralding the approaching storm. In the horizon the darkness of the former painting has now been replaced by the lights of weapons being fired against a background of lightnings. “Die Blitzkrieg” [Lightning War] has been introduced to human history. 

    On other parts of the plant, the syringe has now been emptied into the branch that supports it. The effect from the liquid, white and undisturbed, is an experiment with DNA genetics, suggesting those made by “The Angel of Death”, Josef Mengele.

    The wind sock has been replaced for one in red and white colors showing where the wind blows. The match has been transformed into an olympic torch. The leaves have turned into a stack of bills with the many zeros of hyperinflation.

    The axe stuck in the ground has the executor’s head located on the handle. In lieu of the simple tool depicted in the previous painting, the axe has transformed into nostalgia symbol from a pseudo-romantic past. The intense gaze in the eyes in the decapitated victim’s head continue to stare from the executioner’s hood and his Gestapo cap. The blood no longer flows; it now trickles slowly into the bottle which is less than half full. The rope, previously tied to the shaft of the ax, hangs from the tip of the smaller flower’s tongue. At the other end of the rope a cage with an apple is swinging, indicating that knowledge is being controlled.

    The poker is now exposed through a crack in the flower pot. Stuck on is another apple that is being roasted over a bonfire of books. The cigarette, put out and with lipstick smears, lies in its shadow. In the smoke from the bonfire, the drops of saliva from the monstrous head are dancing. On the right side the yellow object has swung a quarter of a turn and is revealed to be a pocket watch. On its face the most important years for the progress of nazism are shown.

    The spider has exchanged its simple web for one of steel that covers the opening of the flower pot. Cyanide gas is spreading through the grating.

    The cracks in the flower pot has grown into a swastika. The shards from these have fallen on the ground with the glassy side upwards, spelling the word “HEIL”, instead of “HELL” in the previous painting. The shards of glass are a reference to the “Kristallnacht” in November 1938. In the center of the swastika an arm holds a globe in a firm grip. 

    As in the previous painting, unchanged and remaining in the exact same position, a tiger tail dominates. Although all other elements in the composition have moved or changed, including the flower pot that now is located more to the right, the tiger tail is the only thing that is constant. It is the symbol for the evil in humans.

    In this, the second of three paintings, many clues have been given, but the most important ones are still missing. The final explanation will be shown in painting that will be executed in the year 2035.

 

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